Posted by Charity on March 20th, 2009

The other day, I blogged about a proposal to cut the Home Study Office in Vermont and shift the oversight of homeschoolers to the local school districts.

The latest word from Education Commissioner Armando Vilaseca is that the change would require the approval of the legislature (since the proceedure for homeschooling is dictated by a very detailled statute), so nothing will be done this year.

This is not over, though.  The new commissioner does want to take a look at ways to streamline the home study enrollment process.  We should expect a proposal next year.

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6 Responses to “Update On VT Homeschooling”

  1. Home schooling should be outlawed. What trains you to teach you children anything past a middle school level? Science, math, history, and English, and a second language. You must be a genius.

  2. Well, if American students are getting all that education in public schools, how’s come we’re a society without a basic grasp of Math, Science, English (let alone a ’second’ language), and HISTORY (Vietnam/Iraq)???????? Jeez, seems to me home schooling is a threat to mindless consumerism, government control, corporate manipulation and the spiritual/ethical vacuity that puts good education far down the ladder of our priorities. Keep it up, Charity. I’m with you Big Time on this.

    Also, Charity, on the subject of ‘consumer safety’ (CISPIA, Etc.), please see my GMD post on HR-875.

  3. Yeah, “what trains you to teach you children”??????
    Keep them in public school so they can be as eloquent as Bobby.

  4. Public education isn’t failing because the system doesn’t work. It is failing because parents no longer teach their children to earn their way by working hard for what they want. They send them to school, let them fail, and then take it upon themselves to complain until somebody changes some grades. The problem is not with untrained parents as Bobby claims, it is with parents who have all the training in the world yet still fail to raise their children with the values

    If Charity wishes to home school her children all the power to her. I do hope though that she finds her children advanced courses when she, with all the knowledge I am sure she has, no longer can provide adequate instruction.

  5. All the assertions that parents can’t teach their children are distroyed by the reality that homeschooled children do as well, and often better, than children in public schools.

  6. Public education isn’t failing because the system doesn’t work.

    I disagree. I found the schools were not able to focus on the high-achievers and give them more of a challenge. Granted, this was in lower elementary grades, but I was not going to leave my kids in the system to see how the school did as they got older. They were already learning that working harder was discouraged.

    I do hope though that she finds her children advanced courses when she, with all the knowledge I am sure she has, no longer can provide adequate instruction.

    I appreciate your concern. I have no doubt that I could provide adequate instruction. Public school teachers are rarely experts in their fields. There are many curriculum choices for homeschooling parents that include an instructor’s book for the parent to follow. This isn’t rocket science.

    That said, if my children, my husband and I choose to homeschool through high school, I am sure the boys will take classes at community college, or elsewhere, in subjects we decide they need more advanced instruction in.